Silman’s Complete Endgame Course Book Review – From Beginner to Master (2020)

Jeremy Silman was born on the 28th of August, 1954, in Del Rio, Texas, U.S. He is an American International Master of Chess. In the lustrous and very successful career that he boasted, Jeremy has won the American Open, the National Open and the U.S. Open. Additionally, he served as a coach of the U.S. Junior National Chess team.

Silman, while being the accomplished and able chess player, has also published more than thirty-five books. Most of them are on  the  topic  of  chess,  but  some  were  concerned  with  casino  gambling. On the chess.com website, Silman has written many chess mentoring puzzles.

Amongst the plentiful accomplishments that Jeremy has enjoyed, in publishing and in playing, alike, is his great book, which is, incidentally, the focus of our book review of Silman’s Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner to Master.

Silman’s Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner to Master

Certainly not a secret, Jeremy Silman is among the greatest chess writers of all time. In this vein, the book that will be the focus of our examination today is definitely one of his own greatest.

This volume of his is comprised of more than five-hundred pages, and it was published in the year of 2006. Adequately, it has been loved ever since.

Chess players, even from their very first day, are taught to learn of and study the point of the endgame for hours upon hours so as to improve their game as much as humanly possible.

The book of Silman is great for players of all degrees. This is achieved by having the separate phases or parts of the book appropriate for a certain level – starting from the beginner’s phase and all the way up to the master’s level.

Everything works in tandem, as the things you learned in a previous phase are aptly utilized for example and for more complex learning in the latter parts.

The themes, of the most basic kind, that are explained are – Queen and Pawn endgames, Double bishop mate, the Lucena position, the Vancura position, and plenty – truly plenty – more.

Like we mentioned, the book is subdivided into phases for the degree of the reader. As such, the recommended ELO rating for one to have when starting it out – for the novice, for example – is all the way from unrated, and up until – the very advanced and experienced player – a rating of 2,400.

Brimming with all the great and superb tips that one might need, the book also has nine puzzles following the ending of a particular sections. Solutions are also given so that the reader might learn from them, provided that he isn’t already apt to answer them by himself.

Candidly a great book.